OSHA’s Required Training Frequencies

OSHA’s Required Training Frequencies

Jill James

Jill James

Chief Safety Officer

Jill James brings an unrivaled perspective on risk, regulation and liability. With 14 years of experience as a Senior OSHA Safety Investigator with the State of Minnesota, and nearly a decade in the private sector as a safety program manager, Jill is a passionate advocate for training ROI.

OSHA Required Training for Most Workplaces

EMERGENCY RESPONSE

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1917; 1910.35 – 1019.38; 1926.159

This is training all employers must be conducting. Employers have a responsibility to provide workforce training on appropriate response to certain types of emergencies that could affect working environments, including actions employees should take to protect themselves. Such emergencies include fires, unexpected chemical releases, natural disasters, incidents of violence, etc.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Initial training when emergency response plan (ERP) is developed

New hire training

Retraining when worker responsibilities or actions change according to ERP

Whenever ERP has changed.

NOTES

FIRE SAFETY/FIRE EXTINGUISHER

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.157; 1910.35 – 1910.39

This training is for any worker with access to a fire extinguisher, and those expected to use a fire extinguisher to extinguish small fires. OSHA defines a small fire as an "incipient stage fire", meaning, wastepaper basket-sized or smaller. Fire extinguisher training teaches employees how to fight small fires and how to use a fire extinguisher to safely escape a burning building. If you have fire extinguishers in the workplace, your employees need this training.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

Annual retraining

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)

OSHA REQUIRED: YES
OSHA REGULATION: 1910.132 – 1910.138

Safety glasses, hard hats, and ear plugs—each are examples of personal protective equipment. Wearing personal protective equipment PPE is critical to successfully working in many high-risk work environments.

Yet use of PPE is intended as a final option for protecting workers and mitigating hazards; employers must first try protecting the workforce by eliminating hazards before resorting to PPE. For example, muffling noisy equipment to eliminate the need for ear plugs, or using appropriate ventilation rather than respirators, are each engineered controls that reduce the necessity of PPE devices.

If, after exhausting other means to eliminate hazards, workers must wear PPE, then those workers need training on when to wear it, its limitations, how to clean and store it, and what company rules apply to use.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

Retraining when: (1) changes in the workplace render previous training obsolete; (2) changes in the types of PPE to be used render previous training obsolete; (3) inadequacies in worker knowledge or use of assigned PPE indicate that the worker has not retained the requisite understanding or skill

HAZARD COMMUNICATION

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.1200

Hazard Communication training is for any employee who works with a hazardous substance or chemical, including some medications and vaccines, and any chemical requiring a Safety Data Sheet. The purpose of hazard communication training is for workers to understand how a chemical causes harm. For example, employees must know if a chemical is dangerous to inhale, or damaging to skin when handled without gloves.

OSHA’s hazard communication standard was recently amended to incorporate elements of the ‘globally harmonized system’, or GHS. Made up of universal pictograms, the intent of the GHS is to standardize chemical labeling and associated documentation. Today, compliance with OSHA’s hazard communication standard requires compliance with the additional GHS requirements added to the law—those changes became effective on June 1st, 2015.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

When new chemical hazards are introduced to work environment and where workers have not been previously trained on the hazard

HEARING CONSERVATION

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.95; 1910.145

Employers with working environments where noise exceeds OSHA’s permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 90 A-weighted decibels (dBA) over an 8-hour workday, need to provide training on the impact of noise on the human ear, and how employees can and must protect themselves.

If your employees are not exposed to noise exceeding 90 A-weighted decibels over an eight hour period, yet are exposed to higher noise levels for a shorter duration, the permissible exposure limit may be exceeded. OSHA uses a scale for determining the noise exposure threshold. For example, if an employee is exposed to 110 decibels of noise, they can work safely without hearing protection for only 30 minutes.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

Annual retraining

BASIC RESPIRATORY PROTECTION

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.134

Workers who must wear a respirator need training on the limitations of those devices. Workers must know how to properly wear and clean these devices, and how to properly fit one to the face. A respirator is any kind of mask with two straps behind the head; disposable surgical-type masks are not considered respirators. This is critical training because all respirators filter for different contaminants. For example, there are special filters for asbestos, lead, and certain welding fumes.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Train prior to requiring employees to use a respirator in the workplace

Annual retraining when: (1) changes in the workplace or the type of respirator render previous training obsolete; (2) Inadequacies in worker knowledge or use of respirator indicate that the worker has not retained the requisite understanding or skill; (3) Any situation arises in which retraining appears necessary to ensure safety

BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS (BBP)

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.1030; 1910.1020

This training is for workers with, "occupational exposure." Occupational exposure is defined as, "The reasonable anticipation of contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials (OPIM) as a result of performing one’s job duties, and is not limited to employees who experience occupational exposure by virtue of the fact they render certain health care services."

Any worker whose job includes the cleaning and decontaminating of areas where bloodborne pathogens may exist would be considered to have occupational exposure. For example, workers in medical clinics, hospitals, labs, long‐term care facilities, and funeral parlors, require BBP training. If your employees do not fit OSHA’s criteria for occupational exposure, then you do not need to provide this training.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Train at initial assignment to tasks where occupational exposure could occur

Annual retraining

CONFINED SPACES & CONFINED SPACES PERMIT-REQUIRED

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.146

A confined space is defined as, "A space that is large enough a person can enter and perform work, yet has limited or restricted means for entry and exit, and is not designed for continuous occupancy." Examples include: tanks, bins, pits, vats, vessels, excavations, sewer systems, boilers. A "Non-permit confined space" means a confined space that does not contain or, with respect to atmospheric hazards, have the potential to contain any hazard capable of causing death or serious physical harm.

Confined spaces are often places people may only enter once per year to inspect, clean, or perform maintenance. Entry of a confined space is not limited to the entire body; when heads, arms, and legs break the threshold of a confined space, that space is considered entered.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Initial training when assigned to confined space duties

Retraining before there is a change in assigned duties

Retraining when permit space operations are changed to present a hazard for which any worker has not previously received training

Whenever the employer has reason to believe either that there are deviations from the permit space entry procedures required by the law, or that there are inadequacies in the worker’s knowledge or use of these procedures

ELECTRICAL SAFETY

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.302; 1910.308; 1910.331 - 1910.335

Exposure to electricity is one of OSHA’s "Fatal Four" occupational hazards resulting in death. Electrical safety training is intended to teach employees who work with electrical equipment what the limitations are for non‐qualified electricians, and how to avoid exposure to electric shock or electrocution.

Examples of workers who may need electrical safety training include maintenance employees, machine operators, sanitation workers, workers involved with locking and tagging equipment, etc.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Not addressed by OSHA

FORKLIFT OPERATOR

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.178

Any worker who operates a forklift and does not have current proof of training—within the past three years— must be trained. For workers trained within a three-year period, the previous training is transferable from employer to employer, provided that the forklift a worker is being asked to operate is similar to that of the previous employer. OSHA refers to forklifts, and several other types of industrial machinery, as "powered industrial trucks".

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Prior to permitting an employee to operate a powered industrial truck

At least once every 3 years

WELDING

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.252

This training topic is for workers who weld or cut with torches. It can apply to any sort of welding such as, stick or arc welding. In addition to skilled welders, other employees who may need this training include workers who periodically perform welding related to maintenance or repair, for example.

Note: Stainless steel, commonly found in working environments associated with food processing, drug manufacturing, and chemical refining, produces a noxious fume when welding occurs, resulting from the hazardous chemical Chromium VI. Workers with exposure to Chromium VI—as a welding byproduct— need special training on mitigating the hazard presented by the chemical.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Not addressed by OSHA

LAB SAFETY

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.1450

If your company has a non--‐production lab such as in a medical clinic, hospital, pharmacy or some manufacturing facilities, your employees will need a lab safety course to address their special workplace hazards.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

As determined by employer

LOCK OUT/TAG OUT (LOCK AND TAG)

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.331; 1910.147

This training is required for workers performing maintenance, repair, and those who need to understand the rationale of locking and tagging equipment to protect themselves and the general workforce.

A common misconception: Locking and tagging equipment out is a practice reserved for repairing broken equipment that should not be used. While that is true, lock out/tag out is a critical practice for routine equipment maintenance and cleaning activity. For any piece of equipment with more than one power source, employers must provide a step-by-step, written lock out/tag out procedure. For example, power sources include electricity and pneumatics.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Before exposure

Retraining when: (1) change in machine; (2) change in job assignment; (3) new equipment/processes present hazard; (4) change in energy control procedures; (5) after periodic inspections reveal inadequate knowledge or deviations in procedures

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OSHA Required Training for Many Workplaces

AERIAL & SCISSOR LIFTS

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.67; 1910.333; 1910.502; 1926.269

This training is required for any worker who operates a scissor or aerial lift. Aerial lifts have a boom that articulates out, often with a ‘basket’ to transport a worker for elevated tasks.

A worker in an aerial lift must wear a body harness with a lanyard, to prevent the ejection of the worker. Workers in a scissor lift do not need body harnesses with lanyards if the scissor lift has a complete, functioning guardrail.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Not addressed by OSHA

FIRST AID & CPR

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATIONS: 1910.151

This training is required for workers directly involved with emergency response and most medical services. Training is also required for any workforce where the working environment is outside the near proximity distance of an infirmary, clinic, or hospital; OSHA defines a near proximity distance of 3‐4 minutes for high-risk environments, and 15 minutes for office settings.

Note: Each member of confined space rescue service team shall be trained in Basic First Aid and CPR, and at least one member of rescue team shall hold current certification in first aid and in CPR.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Not addressed by OSHA

COMPRESSED GAS SAFETY

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATIONS: 1910.101

This is required training for people performing installation, removal, operation and maintenance work on cylinders or compressed gas systems or cutters, welders and their supervisors.

Note: Training is required to comply with Storage & Handling of Liquefied Petroleum Gases. Training is also required to comply with Oxygen-Fuel Gas Welding & Cutting: "Management shall recognize its responsibility" and "Insist that cutters and welders & their supervisors are suitably trained."

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Not addressed by OSHA

ARC FLASH—NFPA 70E

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATIONS: 1910.335

The two main regulatory bodies that govern electrical safety in the workplace are the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The National Fire Protection Association is recognized for providing information and guidelines that protect workers from electrical hazards, while OSHA is the enforcement agency for electrical safety in the workplace. Under OSHA requirements, the NFPA 70E places additional requirements on all organizations to properly identify hazards and provide training for anyone who may work on, near, or around electrical equipment.

For example, if a worker is tasked with replacing a circuit breaker, or must operate a knife switch to turn power on or off, or is qualified to do electrical work with 600 volts or less, then the worker needs awareness‐level training to understand and protect against the risk of arc flash.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Follow training guidelines for Electrical Safety and PPE courses

New hire training

Retraining according to "if/then" statements for Personal Protective Equipment

PERSONAL FALL ARREST SYSTEMS

OSHA REQUIRED: YES. TRAIN IF/WHEN POWERED PLATFORMS ARE IN USE (AERIAL LIFTS)

OSHA REGULATIONS: 1910.27; 1910.28

This training applies to workers who must wear body harnesses for fall protection or positioning devices while working from aerial lifts, and workers exposed to falls of four feet or higher in general industry work environments. For example, maintenance workers performing certain tasks, workers who enter certain confined spaces, window washers, and workers who work from heights without the benefit of a guardrail system or other safety device.

These workers need training to properly wear, adjust, and tighten a body harness, and must know how to calculate fall distance to ensure correct distances of security lifelines. These workers must also know how to inspect lanyards and lifelines for wear, and understand how to store such devices to maintain structural integrity.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Not addressed by OSHA

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OSHA Required Training for Certain Industries or Specific Types of Work

ASBESTOS AWARENESS

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATIONS: 1910.1001; 1926.1101

Any worker who risks exposure to asbestos containing material (ACM) must have awareness-level training on the hazard. This training teaches workers how to identify ACM.

Note: Awareness-level training does not make employees qualified to remove or conduct asbestos abatement work.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

Annual retraining

CHEMICAL SAFETY

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.1450; 1910.119; 1910.1200

This training is applicable for workers risking exposure to harmful chemicals. For example, volatile chemicals and solvents used in certain industrial settings present a hazard. Certain chemicals contaminate the air and cause respiratory distress, while others are highly combustible. If handled improperly, chemicals may burn, explode, cause cancer and other illnesses, or poison and sicken.

Chemicals may be made of organic or inorganic compounds that, in some combination, are not naturally occurring in the environment, which is part of the reason they present a danger. They are normally highly refined and created for specialized processes or purposes. Working with chemicals involves risk. Carelessness and ignorance of the dangers chemicals may present greatly increases the risk of exposure, or property damage and personal injury. Because there is much to learn about the safe handling of specific chemicals, ignorance is a factor commonly cited in chemical related accidents.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

Retraining as determined by employer

CHLORINE SAFETY

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.1000; 1910.1200

For many of today’s consumer products, chlorine is an indispensable part of the manufacturing process. It is used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, paper, and resins. It is generally regarded as the most effective disinfectant and bleaching agent available today. Chlorine is used in 99% of treated drinking water to prevent the spread of disease. It is also used to disinfect equipment and utensils in hospitals and food processing plants, and to control odor.

Chlorine is often used for cleaning or sanitizing water. If a worker must handle chlorine in liquid or powder form, the worker needs training on chlorine safety.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

For 1910.119 (Process Safety Management): new hire training and retraining every 3 years

For 1910.1200 (Hazard Communication): new hire training; retraining whenever a new chemical hazard that workers have not previously received training for is introduced into work area

FORMALDEHYDE TRAINING

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.1048

Also known as "formalin", formaldehyde is one of the most common industrial chemicals in use today. It is classified as a volatile organic compound. It is also an irritant to many workers and a known human carcinogen. Usually, it is found in liquid form. Formaldehyde is common in medical settings, labs, mortuaries, and in some agricultural settings.

If a worker risks exposure to formaldehyde, the worker needs training on the hazards presented by the substance.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

Annual retraining

Retraining whenever a new formaldehyde exposure risk is introduced

HYDROGEN SULFIDE

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.1000; 1910.134

This training is for workers with limited and routine exposure to decaying organic matter. A bi-product of decaying organic matter—certain industrial wastes, effluents, liquid manure, natural gas—hydrogen sulfide is normally released when chemical reactions breakdown natural substances.

Sewer workers, waste water treatment staff, heating and cooling technicians, and agriculture workers, for example, likely need this training, along with workers tasked with entry of confined spaces.

Note: If exposed as per hazard communication, then training is required.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Follow Hazard Communication requirements

New hire training

Retraining whenever a new chemical hazard that workers have not previously received training for is introduced into work area

INCIDENT INVESTIGATION

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.119

Also known as ‘accident investigation’, this is training mandatory for companies complying with Process Safety Management (PSM) law. For example, incident investigation training applies to many food processing operations, ethanol production facilities, and any setting where over 10,000 pounds of flammable gas or liquid is stored.

For safety professionals, training on incident investigation is considered a critical best practice. Companies mandated to comply with PSM laws must also have a designated incident investigation team, and at least one of team member must be trained for incident investigation.

Note: For PSM compliance 1910.119(M), Incident Investigation teams must have one person "knowledgeable" in investigation process.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Not addressed by OSHA

LEAD AWARENESS

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.1025

This training is for any worker with exposure to lead. Lead is a heavy, soft, gray-blue metallic element found in the earth’s crust. Most occupational exposure to lead comes from activities like mining, smelting, welding, demolition, construction, manufacturing, and through the use of manufactured products containing lead, but lead is perhaps most commonly associated with paint and painting.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

Annual retraining

OVERHEAD & GANTRY CRANES

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA REGULATIONS: 1910.179

OSHA requires worker training on overhead and gantry cranes only when two or more cranes are used to lift a load, in which case a "qualified" person shall be in supervisory role.

"Qualified" means having the skills and abilities related to operation of overhead or gantry cranes.

Note: Training not required when two or more cranes are not used to lift a load. "Qualified" means the worker has the skills and abilities associated with training.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Not addressed by OSHA

PROCESS SAFETY MANAGEMENT

OSHA REQUIRED: YES

OSHA Regulation: 1910. 119; 1910.120; 1910.38

This training is for select employees in environments where over 10,000 lbs. of flammable gas or liquid are present. For example, ammonia tanks used in plant refrigeration systems, other large chemical storage systems, etc.

Process safety management is a comprehensive approach to prevent chemical releases. An effective process safety management program includes an evaluation of the whole process including design and technology, and other elements that might impact the process. Chemical safety starts with a thorough examination of work operations to identify and control risk and potential hazards related to handling of chemicals.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

Retraining every 3 years

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Best Practice Training

BACK SAFETY & INJURY PREVENTION

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

This training is for any workforce lifting and handling heavy objects. Risks for occupational back injury are higher for manufacturing, warehousing, hospitality and trades workers, as well as others with physically demanding jobs. Employers and safety professionals with workers compensation case management responsibilities know the cost of back injuries and how claims can seriously impact insurance rates for several years.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

BEHAVIOR BASED SAFETY

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

Behavior Based Safety is a program designed to influence employee actions toward safer outcomes, ideally by preventing an accident or injury before it occurs. Implementing a behavior based safety program is the most comprehensive way for companies to promote safety, eliminate hazards and prevent injuries.

This training is for safety professionals and safety committee members who are charged with modeling safe behaviors to employees. This training is also useful for building safety culture in the workforce.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

HEAT STRESS & COLD STRESS

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

Workers exposed to harmful physical elements such as extreme heat or cold, need to know how to prevent heat related illnesses and/or frostbite and hypothermia. This training is for workers with routine exposure to outdoor/indoor environments where extreme temperatures are present.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

DRIVER SAFETY & DISTRACTED DRIVING

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

Driving on the job is a high-risk, high liability scenario, and it happens every day, which is why there are so many accidents related to transportation of goods and other services.

Great training and caution are essential to lowering the risk related to your mobile workforce.

As a best practice, training on driver safety and distracted driving should be provided by employers who have workers driving non-commercial vehicles. For some employers, auto insurance companies may offer a discount if employees are trained in safe driving practices.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

HAND & POWER TOOL SAFETY

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

This training is a recommended best practice for any worker tasked with regular operation of hand and power tools. As tool users, workers have a primary role in safety. Employees must have clear, established safety protocols for working with each unique piece of equipment and workers must follow those procedures when using tools, while relying on training to operate equipment safely.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

INDOOR AIR QUALITY

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

Indoor air quality concerns relate to the existence of undesirable and sometimes harmful indoor airborne contaminants and other air qualities that can adversely impact the comfort and health of building occupants. This training is a recommended best practice for supervisors, managers, and safety committees, and details the risks of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, mold, healthy air exchange rates, along with options for mitigation.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

INDUSTRIAL ERGONOMICS

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

Workers at risk for musculoskeletal injuries (shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, neck, back, etc.) are generally those who perform repetitive work in manufacturing, processing lines, healthcare, assembly, and packaging work. These injuries drive workers compensation rates greatly, and are often called soft-tissue injuries. This training is for supervisors and safety professionals working in a capacity to address musculoskeletal injuries.

The term "ergonomics" refers to making the workplace conducive to the comfort and productivity of the employee. Applying ergonomic principles helps workers avoid on-the-job illness and injury and improves worker job satisfaction through measures that provide a greater comfort, helping people to perform assigned tasks more naturally.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

NOTES

FLAMMABLE LIQUID SAFETY

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.106

Employees who work directly with flammable liquids, either by moving, storing, or disposing of such liquids, should have this training.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

New hire training

NOTES

LADDER SAFETY

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.25; 1910.27; 1910.333

This is for any worker who regularly uses a ladder in the performance of work. Ladders are used in many jobs for cleaning, painting, changing light bulbs, accessing storage areas, reaching platforms, and more. This training is useful for workers that use ladders on the sides of vehicles, tanks, ladders for repair work, and ladders used daily to gain access to other levels. There are many types of ladders; each of these ladder types pose special hazards and training for each type is critical.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

MACHINE GUARDING

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.212; 1910.217

Note: Mechanical power-press operation law specifically requires training before exposure and at least annually thereafter.

This training is for workers who operate complex machinery. OSHA requires that one or more methods of machine guarding be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from hazards created by moving parts, as well as preventing contact with other hazards such as heat, non-ionizing radiation, sharp edges, etc.

Machines that are not properly safeguarded can cause serious injury, such as crushed or severed fingers, hands and arms, eye injuries, and even blindness. Shortcuts around machine safety features are a frequently cited cause for many machine related accidents, occurring when workers decide to forego the normal protocol of working with a safeguard and bypass it altogether, leaving them with considerable risk of harm and injury.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

Prior to use

Annual retraining

OFFICE ERGONOMICS

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

This training is for any safety professional, or manager with a workforce at risk for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), as well as employees. According to the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), industries with the highest musculoskeletal disorders rates include health care, transportation, warehousing, retail, and wholesale trade and construction. Each year, musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) cases account for around 33% of all worker injury and illness.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

SAFE DRIVING BEHAVIORS FOR CMV’S

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

All commercial motor vehicle drivers can benefit from this training. Commercial Motor Vehicles (CMVs) and other heavy trucking rigs present unique hazards that lighter vehicles, like cars driven by the general public, do not—these critical factors must be accounted for, to protect everyone on the road.

Safety professionals and organizations offering this training should contact auto insurance carriers about premium discounts.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

SAFETY AUDITS

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

This training is for any employee tasked with abating safety hazards, safety committees and committee members, safety professionals, and supervisors who have responsibility to identify workplace hazards.

Safety audits are intended to assure that effective program elements are in place for identifying, eliminating, or controlling hazards that could adversely impact a company’s physical and human assets. Conducted properly, this type of audit will help reduce injury and illness rates, lower workers compensation and other business costs, empower employees by involving them in activities affecting their own safety and health, increase job satisfaction, and make the company more competitive.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

SLIPS, TRIPS, AND FALLS

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: 1910.21, 1910.22, 1910.23, 1910.24

This training is universally relevant for all workforces. Recent statistics from the Congressional Accountability Office of Compliance indicate that employee falls are private industry’s third leading cause of workplace fatalities. Around 600 workers die from a fatal slip, trip, or fall, each year.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer

WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

OSHA REQUIRED: NO

OSHA REGULATION: NONE

This training is appropriate for workers in any workplace setting. OSHA has identified high‐risk industries including-health care; social services; late--‐night retail settings, such as convenience stores, liquor stores, gas stations as industries they strongly urge to provide training. Additionally, some states have specific laws regarding workplace violence prevention training, so pay attention to those.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

As determined by employer