A Decade with OSHA’s Outreach Training Program

A Decade with OSHA’s Outreach Training Program

Scott Wallace

Scott Wallace

Director of OSHA Outreach

Since 1993 I’ve been involved with workplace safety. I started by researching, writing and producing safety training videos. Which then lead to interactive training programs on laser disc, CDROMs and eventually web based online training programs. I also became an OSHA Outreach Trainer and have overseen our OSHA 10 and 30 Hour online course offerings since we became an authorized vendor in 2005. I find it very rewarding that my job allows me to make a positive difference in workers lives.

Eight million, eight hundred forty-six thousand, three hundred and eighty-two (8,846,382)

That is how many workers have been trained in the last ten years (2008-2018) through OSHA’s Outreach Training Program. This total is likely to increase by 1 million or more in 2019 based on the program’s growth during this same period.

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  • FY 2008 = 679,677
  • FY 2009 = 754,696
  • FY 2010 = 781,578
  • FY 2011 = 716,062
  • FY 2012 = 689,814
  • FY 2013 = 736,059
  • FY 2014 = 776,986
  • FY 2015 = 838,898
  • FY 2016 = 900,015
  • FY 2017 = 906,532
  • FY 2018 = 1,066,065

These numbers are very impressive considering that the Outreach Program is voluntary, and the training is not required by any OSHA standard. Nor does the training count towards any of the required worker training by OSHA standards.

According to OSHA, outreach training is designed for workers and focuses on recognition, avoidance, abatement and prevention of workplace hazards. The training also includes additional information on employer responsibilities, worker’s rights and how to file a complaint.

The training is divided into four main work areas: Construction, General Industry, Maritime and Disaster Sites. For OSHA’s fiscal year of 2018, the breakdown of trainees per class type was as follows.

Construction embodies a combined 74.1% of all trainees, which I’m sure is due to the fact that many States and job sites require workers to possess an OSHA 10 or 30 Hour Construction card.

Since Construction and General Industry represent the clear majority of the students, let’s look at the top 20 standards which were cited by Federal OSHA during the period October 2017 through September 2018. We will start with Construction and then look at General Industry. You can select each standard in the left column for more specific information.

Construction

Standard

Citations

Inspections

Penalty

Description

Total

27,223

11,017

$79,405,619

All Standards cited for Construction

19260501

6,419

6,241

$31,040,798

Duty to have fall protection.

19260451

2,842

1,412

$7,187,013

General requirements.

19261053

2,388

2,021

$5,559,927

Ladders.

19260503

1,748

1,690

$2,534,034

Training requirements.

19260102

1,377

1,371

$3,060,463

Eye and face protection.

19260020

870

814

$2,511,085

General safety and health provisions.

19260100

840

840

$1,790,692

Head protection.

19101200

814

435

$690,563

Hazard Communication.

19260453

791

724

$2,114,497

Aerial lifts.

19260502

745

548

$1,792,910

Fall protection systems criteria and practices.

19260651

543

364

$2,068,976

Specific Excavation Requirements.

19261153

504

184

$731,962

--- No Description Found ---

19100134

473

207

$429,544

Respiratory Protection.

19260652

464

415

$2,598,344

Requirements for protective systems.

19260021

418

418

$1,202,831

Safety training and education.

19030019

383

311

$128,667

Abatement verification.

19260454

332

312

$483,206

Training requirements.

19260405

318

261

$430,465

Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use.

19261052

311

265

$643,120

Stairways.

19261060

261

259

$264,548

Training requirements.

General Industry

The General Industry numbers are broken into three parts.

Part 1 (Food Manufacturing, Beverage and Tobacco Manufacturing, Textile Mills, Apparel Manufacturing, Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing)

Standard

Citations

Inspections

Penalty

Description

Total

1,974

656

$8,610,216

All Standards cited for Manufacturing (part 1 of 3)

19100147

370

207

$2,873,423

The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout).

19100212

205

198

$1,696,177

General requirements for all machines.

19101200

135

80

$196,460

Hazard Communication.

19100119

129

24

$663,692

Process safety management of highly hazardous chemicals.

19100219

104

69

$354,369

Mechanical power-transmission apparatus.

19100178

92

78

$263,222

Powered industrial trucks.

19100305

92

64

$181,746

Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use.

19100134

77

43

$84,399

Respiratory Protection.

19100303

72

55

$217,772

General requirements.

19100132

56

44

$165,985

General requirements.

19100028

55

45

$248,942

Safety requirements for scaffolding.

19100037

36

29

$94,465

Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

19100151

35

35

$143,278

Medical services and first aid.

19040039

33

33

$110,753

--- No Description Found ---

5A0001

31

31

$233,307

OSH Act General Duty Paragraph

19100263

29

23

$123,119

Bakery equipment.

19100022

27

25

$92,934

General requirements.

19100146

27

13

$65,102

Permit-required confined spaces

19100272

22

8

$31,829

Grain handling facilities.

19100157

21

18

$21,107

Portable fire extinguishers.

Part 2 (Wood Product Manufacturing, Paper Manufacturing, Printing and Related Support Activities, Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing, Chemical Manufacturing, Plastics and Rubber Products Manufacturing, Nonmetallic Mineral Product Manufacturing)

Standard

Citations

Inspections

Penalty

Description

Total

5,765

1,521

$20,671,680

All Standards cited for Manufacturing (part 2 of 3)

19100147

889

479

$4,770,546

The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout).

19101200

530

291

$727,917

Hazard Communication.

19100134

449

199

$854,288

Respiratory Protection.

19100212

416

379

$2,660,301

General requirements for all machines.

19100178

337

231

$1,145,079

Powered industrial trucks.

19100305

233

151

$417,460

Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use.

19100219

223

148

$969,758

Mechanical power-transmission apparatus.

19100095

202

120

$589,267

Occupational noise exposure.

19100303

178

138

$485,682

General requirements.

19100119

177

45

$986,969

Process safety management of highly hazardous chemicals.

19100132

169

140

$481,544

General requirements.

19100213

142

75

$497,237

Woodworking machinery requirements.

19100022

122

107

$478,195

General requirements.

19100028

110

98

$472,231

Safety requirements for scaffolding.

19100157

96

77

$87,137

Portable fire extinguishers.

5A0001

90

89

$759,774

OSH Act General Duty Paragraph

19100037

87

70

$157,909

Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

19040039

81

81

$283,262

--- No Description Found ---

19100146

77

35

$261,162

Permit-required confined spaces

19100215

58

37

$92,044

Abrasive wheel machinery.

Part 3 (Primary Metal Manufacturing, Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing, Machinery Manufacturing, Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing, Electrical Equipment, Appliance, and Component Manufacturing, Transportation Equipment Manufacturing, Furniture and Related Product Manufacturing, Miscellaneous Manufacturing)

Standard

Citations

Inspections

Penalty

Description

Total

8,534

2,355

$24,537,381

All Standards cited for Manufacturing (part 3 of 3)

19100134

854

358

$852,216

Respiratory Protection.

19100147

848

479

$3,896,619

The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout).

19101200

813

463

$985,804

Hazard Communication.

19100212

774

693

$4,304,433

General requirements for all machines.

19100178

491

350

$1,237,291

Powered industrial trucks.

19100305

295

215

$538,552

Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use.

19100303

257

202

$687,961

General requirements.

19100132

248

200

$478,056

General requirements.

19100215

220

119

$361,722

Abrasive wheel machinery.

19100095

190

95

$553,542

Occupational noise exposure.

19100213

167

90

$380,097

Woodworking machinery requirements.

19100107

165

77

$303,064

Spray finishing using flammable and combustible materials.

19100219

156

97

$439,328

Mechanical power-transmission apparatus.

19100157

135

105

$165,480

Portable fire extinguishers.

19100217

135

69

$858,408

Mechanical power presses.

19100022

134

122

$432,572

General requirements.

19100028

118

100

$478,218

Safety requirements for scaffolding.

19100037

118

98

$171,294

Maintenance, safeguards, and operational features for exit routes.

5A0001

118

115

$714,476

OSH Act General Duty Paragraph

19101026

112

52

$168,277

--- No Description Found ---

 

As you can see from the above tables, Fall Protection is a big issue in Construction and Lockout/Tagout for General Industry. Hazard Communication (chemical labeling, Safety Data Sheets, etc.) along with Personal Protective Equipment topics (respiratory, eye and head protection) are also towards the top of each table. These numbers also coincide with what OSHA has mandated as certain required topics to be part of each class. These can change when injury or citation numbers point to different issues.

Below are the current required topics for the two 10-Hour courses as reference.

OSHA 10-Hour Construction

  • Introduction to OSHA – 1 Hour
  • Falls – 1.5 Hours
  • Electrocution – 30 Minutes
  • Struck-By - 30 Minutes
  • Caught-In or Between - 30 Minutes
  • Personal Protective and Lifesaving Equipment - 30 Minutes
  • Health Hazards in Construction – 30 Minutes

OSHA 10-Hour General Industry

  • Introduction to OSHA – 1 Hour
  • Walking and Working Surfaces, including Fall Protection – 1 Hour
  • Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, Fire Prevention Plans and Fire Protection – 1 Hour
  • Electrical – 1 Hour
  • Personal Protective Equipment – 1 Hour
  • Hazard Communication – 1 Hour

Recognizing and understanding the potential hazards we could encounter each day at work is very important in protecting a company’s most valuable assets – it’s people. We all want to return home safe and healthy each day to enjoy life with our families. Safety training plays an important part in allowing us to obtain the knowledge needed to make this happen.